Normal for Norfolk

 

World Class Food and Farming

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Norfolk has historically been a major centre for agriculture and food production. In the 18th century, Norfolk was the cradle of the Agrarian Revolution with great landowners such as Thomas William Coke, first Earl of Leicester, known affectionately as 'Coke of Norfolk' and Charles Viscount Townshend, known as 'Turnip' Townshend, revolutionising all aspects of farming. This in turn enabled the Industrial Revolution and thus changed the world.  

In the 20th Century the John Innes Centre was one of the leading organisations in the green revolution which through plant breeding enabled food production to keep up with world demand. Norfolk farming maintains its place in world farming through high production efficiencies alongside strong environmental commitment. Norfolk has for example lead the way in environmental policy with the Broads Grazing Marsh Conservation Scheme - the first environmental policy of its type which is now copied worldwide. Farming is supported by Easton College whilst the largest farming cooperative in the country is the award winning Anglia Farmers. The Royal Norfolk Show attracts some 100,000 visitors over its two days.

This agricultural legacy is reflected by the global food and drink brands like Colman’s, who source their mustard locally;  Robinsons whose blackcurrants come from Norfolk and Bernard Matthews with their farms in the County. More recent food companies who have chosen Norfolk include Kettle Chips and Linda McCartney. There are also specialist food producers based here such as Place UK who are leaders in soft fruit.

In turn the County has become home to innovators and leaders in both food processing and packaging such as AEW Delford and agricultural machinery such as Sands. There are also world leading refrigeration companies such as Fosters, Williams and ‘Fresh Pod’, an innovative device to extend the life of fresh fruit and vegetables. 

Hidden Gem Case Study – Sinclair International

 

For more information contact Michael Mack on 01603 731285 mmack@easton-college.ac.uk